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MEXLAW > Immigration  > Becoming a Naturalized Mexican Through Marriage

Becoming a Naturalized Mexican Through Marriage

As a foreigner married to a Mexican citizen, you can apply and receive your temporary residency right away by providing proof of the marriage and proof that your Mexican spouse can financially support you here in Mexico.

The married foreigner will receive one year of temporary residency; the residency will be renewed for a second year. Upon renewal, in the third year, you may apply for either permanent residency which never expires, or you may wish to apply for Mexican citizenship.

This method of naturalization or citizenship is an option for foreigners who have lived continuously in Mexico for two years previous to the application date and can prove they are married to a Mexican citizen.

As a spouse of a Mexican, you will not be required to leave Mexico to begin the residency process.

Naturalization Benefits to Immigrants

  • Purchase property in restricted areas without a trust (fideicomiso).
  • The possibility of dissolving your current trust (fideicomiso) rewrite the title deed in your name.
  • The right to vote in Mexico.
  • No need to inform the National Institute of Immigration (INM) of each change regarding your living and work situation.
  • Avoid the expense of changing your immigration status or renewal fees.
  • Hold a Mexican passport and enjoy reduced wait times for immigration at Mexican airports.
  • Hold dual citizenship (if your country of origin allows dual citizenship).
  • The right to work for any employer in Mexico, the business will not require a Constancia de empleador.

Requirements

  • Original and copy of the completed application form: http://sre.gob.mx/images/stories/docnatnacio/dnn3.pdf
  • Original and two copies of your passport.
  • Original and two copies of  Mexican ID.
  • Original and two copies of resident card.
  • Demonstrate continuous residency in the country for a minimum of two years prior to the date of the application and be valid for at least six months after applying.
  • Copy of Unique Code of Population Registry CURP (Clave Única de Registro de Población)
  • Original and two additional copies of a foreign birth certificate issued by the appropriate Civil Registry office. The birth certificate must be legalized at a Mexican consulate or apostilled by a competent authority.
  • Certificates must be translated into Spanish by a Mexican government-authorized translator.
  • Original and two additional copies of the marriage certificate of the foreign applicant issued by the appropriate Civil Registry office. If the wedding took place in another country, the certificate must be legalized by the Mexican consular representative or be apostilled by a competent authority. This document must be translated into Spanish by a Mexican government approved translator.
  • Letter under oath with two copies, recording the number of exits and entries to and from the country over the past two years preceding the date of the application. (You should not be out of Mexico more than 180 days during that period
  • Original and two copies of “Certificado de NO Antecedentes Penales” (No Criminal Record Certificate) issued by a competent authority at federal and state entities in your place of residency.
  • Demonstrate you have a basic conversational level of Spanish.
  • Complete a questionnaire regarding Mexican history and general culture.
  • Be integrated into the national culture.
  • Applicants aged 60 and over are not obliged to take the test but will be interviewed by an officer of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and will be required to speak some Spanish.
  • Two passport-size pictures, frontal with a white background, no glasses, bare head.
  • Applicants will travel to Mexico City for fingerprints and questionnaire or interview.
  • Proof of payment of the application fee is required.

The processing time for this procedure is approximately four to six months.

If you have any inquires about immigration to Mexico, contact Adriana@mexlaw.ca